Nagoya Castle

The bombardments during World War II brought great destruction to the castle. The main donjon was fortunately fully reconstructed. Reconstruction of the Honmaru Palace begun in 2009 and is expected to be completed by 2017. The Nagoya castle is recognised for its golden dolphins on the castle’s topmost roof. Each of them (male and female) contain approximately 45 kg of gold. The keep is the main attraction at Nagoya Castle with fully modern facilities and exhibits relating to the castle’s history. The panorama of Nagoya from the upper level observatory is also quite impressive.

See more images


See geographical info


Ginkakuji, the silver temple

The owner of the Ginkakuji temple wanted to cover it in silver similarly to what his grandpa had done with the Kinkakuji (the golden temple). The economy was not good at that time and he could never afford the silver to cover it. The temple is still very famous for its beautiful gardens, and one can get a very nice view of Kyoto within a short distance walk in the hillside garden.

See more images


See geographical info


The rice mill

Mitsuko wanted to cook some fresh rice for our last meal, so we got some rice bags from the latest crop and went to the rice mill. The rice mill is a do-it-yourself automatic facility where you simply put some money to start the machine and select your preferred setting from highly refined (white rice) to coarser (brown rice). You put the rice with the shells on one side and it comes out as white rice on the other. Fresh rice tastes so good!

See more images


See geographical info


Onioshidashi, the village buried under lava

The lava flow resulting from the eruption of Asama mountain on August 5 1783 completely buried the village of Kanbara. Today the site is a protected natural park with a temple dedicated to the victims of the eruption.

See more images


See geographical info


Foggy hike on mount Shirane

The next day, we went on for some hiking on another summit of mount Shirane. We were in the middle of the clouds for the greatest part of the day but we enjoyed the hike nonetheless. As a testimony that mt. Shirane is still quite active, there were numerus fumarol, those vents from which volcanic gas escape. The air was foul-smelling (like rotten eggs) because of the high sulfur content (H2S Hydrogen sulfide).

See more images


See geographical info


Mount Shirane – The volcano!

Mount Shirane is an active volcano of 2160m in the prefecture of Kusatsu. Close access to the crater was restricted, perhaps because of hazardous amounts of sulfur in the air. Despite some cloud cover, the view was quite impressive.

See more images


See geographical info